Tavern on the Green

Kevin & Jim Caiolla (co-owner) pose as Jim reminds Kevin that this is supposed to be a black tie event.  Kevin points out that he is, indeed, wearing a black tie.
Kevin & Jim Caiolla (co-owner) pose as Jim reminds Kevin that this is supposed to be a black tie event. Kevin points out that he is, indeed, wearing a black tie.

Two young and earnest artists met one day 25 years ago at a life drawing class.  One admired the other’s curves (in his drawings) and the other commented on the subtle shading of the other’s.  They became friends and most improbably, one went into the restaurant business and the other into the textile business.  Even more improbably they both flourished in their life choices.  Still friends, Kevin O’Brien of Kevin O’Brien Studio and David Salama (along with his partner Jim Caiolla) collaborated on some of the decor for the new Tavern on the Green.  David and Jim, two guys from Philly, are the new owners of the fabled restaurant in Central Park, which is not improbable at all when you see what they can do with food as well as interior design.  They just opened this past month and Kevin and his wife, Myoshin Thurman O’Brien, were invited to the grand gala that opened the doors for the first time in years. Amidst all the glitz and glam you can see Kevin’s velvet curtains hanging around the place.

Kevin & Myoshin looking dashing as they make an appearance on the red carpet.  Myoshin turned the camera on the photographers to get this shot.
Kevin & Myoshin looking dashing as they make an appearance on the red carpet. Myoshin turned the camera on the photographers to get this shot.
A few snaps of the glitz & glam of the new building.  Kevin having fun taking photos.
A few snaps of the glitz & glam of the new building. Kevin having fun taking photos.
Kevin showing off his work.  Myoshin looking fabulous in the beautiful new interior of Tavern on the Green.
Kevin showing off his work. Myoshin looking fabulous in the beautiful new interior of Tavern on the Green.

A very good idea is to go there yourself and see how this venerable symbol of NYC has been updated to reflect the city – it’s history, its vibrant present, and optimism for it’s future.  It’s all there, in the ancient woodwork, now lit by beautiful expanses of modern glass, the old stone and brick, now cleaner than when it was new, but with the soft beauty of age, and the ancient barn beams quietly presiding overhead, as they have done since sheep slept here and later when generations of past New Yorkers celebrated life here, and as they will do in the future as the new New York invents itself.  Oh, and the food’s great too!

 

A brief overview of the painting of the curtains.  Don't worry, the steaming process will tone the color down a bit.
A brief overview of the painting of the curtains. Don’t worry, the steaming process will tone the color down a bit.

Above you can see the painting of the fabric for the curtains. From top to bottom, you can see Max and Kevin stretching the blank fabric, the fabric being painted on one side, and the final side being painted. Once the fabric is painted, it is taken down to be steamed and rinsed. Next stop, cutting and sewing!