Sumptuous Scarves

A VERY VELVET WONDERLAND

We are very happy that both velvet and scarves are back in fashion! Twenty-two years ago, we started as scarf makers because it was the simplest thing to make out of fabric besides napkins. Now that we are fully engaged in our bedding and pillow business, we like to go back to the scarves so we can play with a different set of colors. We can be bolder, use more luscious colors, and wilder combinations. We are glad to see deep rich velvets in use by designers such as John Rocha, Donna Karan, and Josie Natori.

 

Photo Credit: Accessories Magazine via Vogue
Photo Credit: Accessories Magazine via Vogue

We’ve noticed big fur on trend this year while at the same time we have recently found the deepest pile velvet available. It is so lush it’s nearly faux fur and just in time for what is on the runway! Since we dye each piece of fabric in our studio we can capture color depth and variation like no one else. Put one of these scarves on and feel the cozy comfort in the most luxurious style.

 

Left to Right: Panne Velvet Loop in Raspberry, Dove, & Midnight
Left to Right: Panne Velvet Loop in Raspberry, Dove, & Midnight

 

Along with these new deeper piled velvets, we’ve added colors to our shibori line. This technique continues to be utilized in home furnishings as well as fashion. Shibori can look natural and organic while still forming a repetitive and structural pattern. In keeping with the watercolor print trend from designers such as Galliano and in-trend colors, we’ve added a gray color called Sterling. However, we couldn’t resist taking on some more challenging colors as well (see below). Our new Patina colorway takes color to a new level!

 

Galliano- Photo Credit: Vogue (Kim Weston Arnold/Indigitalimages.com)
Galliano- Photo Credit: Vogue (Kim Weston Arnold/Indigitalimages.com)

 

Left to Right: Rorschach Copper, Rorschach Sterling, Rorschach Patina
Left to Right: Rorschach Copper, Rorschach Sterling, Rorschach Patina

 

We’ve transformed some of our more popular patterns into scarves. The Vines pattern is a large-scale bold pattern with layered colors that makes the velvet feel like a magical forest. Op Art is our take on the optical art of the 1960’s that creates the illusions using geometric shapes. Our Leopard print, a timeless pattern is updated in luxe velvet.

 

Left to Right: Vines in Cobalt/Black, Op Art in Smoke, Leopard in Plum
Left to Right: Vines in Cobalt/Black, Op Art in Smoke, Leopard in Plum

Art & Sole

Robb Reichard (executive director of AIDS Fund), Jane Gershon Weitzman, Kevin O'Brien (photo by Ursula Pruchniewska)
Robb Reichard (executive director of AIDS Fund), Jane Gershon Weitzman, Kevin O’Brien (photo by Ursula Pruchniewska)

Jane Gershon Weitzman, the inimitable woman behind much of the success of Stuart Weitzman Shoes,  has been a fan of Kevin O’Brien Studio, and a friend of Kevin’s for many years.  Building their company since the ’80s she and Stuart have sold their business and now Jane has even better things to do, she raises money for any number of good causes through a book about shoes she has created.  Now that we at Kevin O’Brien Studio are finally on our feet in our new headquarters (a totally rebuilt movie theater from the thirties), we are able to invite people to our manufacturing and design facility.  So it became clear that Jane and Kevin had to do something together, that something was an event to support the work of the AIDS Fund.

 

(photo by Ursula Pruchniewska)
(photo by Ursula Pruchniewska)
Some sample photos from Art&Sole
Some sample photos from Art&Sole
aidsfundblurb
For more information on the AIDS Fund, please visit their website. (photo by Urszula Pruchniewska)

 

For many years, Kevin O’Brien Studio lived up to the description “scrappy upstart” and did our business from a historic, but creaky and ancient loft in Philadelphia’s Old City district, but all things, even companies, must grow up.  After an unseemly long adolescence, we have burst upon the scene (in our own minds at least) and opened our beautiful new space to our guests. On a recent May evening, Jane gave her funny and heartwarming address about her new book, Art&Sole. The book would seem to just be about shoes, but the stories that Jane told were about a lifetime of using her company to create opportunities for all sorts of New Yorkers who needed a bit of a helping hand, be it in the LGBT community, inner city schools, or breast and ovarian cancer.  There wasn’t a dry eye in the crowd as Jane recited stories about how she was able to help so many people simply by thinking differently about how to use her position at a very successful company.

 

(photo by Urszula Pruchniewska)
(photo by Urszula Pruchniewska)
Jane giving her presentation (photo by Urszula Pruchniewska)
Jane giving her presentation (photo by Urszula Pruchniewska)

Afterwards, Jane answered lots of questions and signed books while the Aids Fund volunteers served up food and drinks. Meanwhile, Kevin and Angela (the KOBS manager) gave tours of our facilities. Then the raffle winners were read out and people went home with goodies from El Dorado Rum, Bernie RobbinsBitars RestaurantStarbucksTrinity FramingMerritt GalleryPhiladelphia Theatre CompanyIn LiquidA Girl Named KatieShane’s CandiesCandy CoatedBlush SalonSouth Philly AccupuntureFarm & Fisherman Tavern & MarketNickolette Phillips Design & Tailoring, Eat-a-Pita,
More Then Just Ice Cream and artists such as Nikolay Milushev (YOMI t.g.m.b.) and Tim McFarlane.


(photo by Urszula Pruchniewska)
(photo by Urszula Pruchniewska)
Catherine, Lee, & Sarah modeling some of our raffle items
Catherine, Lee, & Sarah modeling some of our raffle items
We clearly take fun very seriously
We clearly take fun very seriously

Serious money was raised and serious fun was had.





Tavern on the Green

Kevin & Jim Caiolla (co-owner) pose as Jim reminds Kevin that this is supposed to be a black tie event.  Kevin points out that he is, indeed, wearing a black tie.
Kevin & Jim Caiolla (co-owner) pose as Jim reminds Kevin that this is supposed to be a black tie event. Kevin points out that he is, indeed, wearing a black tie.

Two young and earnest artists met one day 25 years ago at a life drawing class.  One admired the other’s curves (in his drawings) and the other commented on the subtle shading of the other’s.  They became friends and most improbably, one went into the restaurant business and the other into the textile business.  Even more improbably they both flourished in their life choices.  Still friends, Kevin O’Brien of Kevin O’Brien Studio and David Salama (along with his partner Jim Caiolla) collaborated on some of the decor for the new Tavern on the Green.  David and Jim, two guys from Philly, are the new owners of the fabled restaurant in Central Park, which is not improbable at all when you see what they can do with food as well as interior design.  They just opened this past month and Kevin and his wife, Myoshin Thurman O’Brien, were invited to the grand gala that opened the doors for the first time in years. Amidst all the glitz and glam you can see Kevin’s velvet curtains hanging around the place.

Kevin & Myoshin looking dashing as they make an appearance on the red carpet.  Myoshin turned the camera on the photographers to get this shot.
Kevin & Myoshin looking dashing as they make an appearance on the red carpet. Myoshin turned the camera on the photographers to get this shot.
A few snaps of the glitz & glam of the new building.  Kevin having fun taking photos.
A few snaps of the glitz & glam of the new building. Kevin having fun taking photos.
Kevin showing off his work.  Myoshin looking fabulous in the beautiful new interior of Tavern on the Green.
Kevin showing off his work. Myoshin looking fabulous in the beautiful new interior of Tavern on the Green.

A very good idea is to go there yourself and see how this venerable symbol of NYC has been updated to reflect the city – it’s history, its vibrant present, and optimism for it’s future.  It’s all there, in the ancient woodwork, now lit by beautiful expanses of modern glass, the old stone and brick, now cleaner than when it was new, but with the soft beauty of age, and the ancient barn beams quietly presiding overhead, as they have done since sheep slept here and later when generations of past New Yorkers celebrated life here, and as they will do in the future as the new New York invents itself.  Oh, and the food’s great too!

 

A brief overview of the painting of the curtains.  Don't worry, the steaming process will tone the color down a bit.
A brief overview of the painting of the curtains. Don’t worry, the steaming process will tone the color down a bit.

Above you can see the painting of the fabric for the curtains. From top to bottom, you can see Max and Kevin stretching the blank fabric, the fabric being painted on one side, and the final side being painted. Once the fabric is painted, it is taken down to be steamed and rinsed. Next stop, cutting and sewing!